Quick Answer: How Do You Use Who’S In A Sentence?

Which is or that is?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use.

If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”.

Who is VS that is?

When you are determining whether you should use who or that, keep these simple guidelines in mind: Who is always used to refer to people. That is always used when you are talking about an object. That can also be used when you are talking about a class or type of person, such as a team.

Whose or who’s example?

Who’s is a contraction, meaning it’s two words stuck together. The formula: who + is, or who + has. For example: who’s hungry? Whose is a possessive pronoun.

How do you use when in a sentence?

When sentence examplesWhen she glanced at him, he was eyeing her, a wry smile twisting his lips. … He had climbed many a tree when he was a boy. … As always, he had been there when she needed him. … That served another purpose when the conversation turned to the possibility of another child.More items…

Whose fault or who’s fault?

First off, you need the possessive pronoun of who in front of the noun fault; that’s whose, not who’s. Who’s is the contraction of who is or who has. Second, the sentence is not in the interrogative.

Who’s birthday or whose?

One way to figure out whether you should use “who’s” or “whose” is to say “who is” out loud to yourself as you read or write. If that makes sense in the sentence, you should use who’s. If it doesn’t, you should use whose.

Who determines fault in a car accident?

Deciding who is at fault is typically the job of an insurance adjuster who investigates the accident.

Is it Chris’s or Chris?

The truth is that Chris takes just an apostrophe only if you follow the rules in the The Associated Press Stylebook. In other style guides, Chris takes an apostrophe and an s: Chris’s. … Form the possessive of singular nouns and abbreviations by adding an apostrophe and an s.

Which is example sentence?

All of which was beside the point. Connie returned with a cool damp rag which she placed on Lisa’s face and then the back of her neck. The dining room was directly off the kitchen, which was also lavish.

How do you use Whose in a sentence examples?

“Whose” is a possessive pronoun like “his,” “her” and “our.” We use “whose” to find out which person something belongs to. Examples: Whose camera is this? Whose dog is barking outside?

Who vs whom examples sentences?

For example, “Who is the best in class?” If you rewrote that question as a statement, “He is the best in class.” makes sense. Use whom when a sentence needs an object pronoun like him or her. For example, “This is for whom?” Again, if you rewrote that question as a statement, “This is for him.” sounds correct.

How do you use the word who in a sentence?

When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence. Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition.

Who and which sentences?

Use comas before who and which when the clause can be taken out without changing the meaning of the sentence. Comas are for extra information. “My daughter, who was born in Venice, is 17.” In the above sentence, “who was born in Venice” is extra information and can be removed: “My daughter is 17.”

Who’s phone or whose phone?

Whose phone is correct, not who’s phone. Because the phrase is about the person who owns or possesses the phone, we need a possessive pronoun. One way to confirm that whose is correct is to replace the word with the phrase who is. If the sentence still make sense, then you need who’s, or the contraction of who is.

Who’s dog or whose dog?

So, in this case, whose is a possessive adjective, because it describes who owns something. Traditionally, whose was only used to describe a person or several persons, as in “Sarah, whose dog is cute, just arrived.” In this case, whose indicates which person’s (Sarah’s) dog we’re talking about.

Whose side are you on or who’s side are you on?

Whose is the possessive of who, just as its is the possessive of it. So, this is the correct version of the sentence: ✔ I need to hear both sides of the story to know whose side I’m on.

What is your fault?

A fault is an error caused by ignorance, bad judgment or inattention. … If you say, “It’s my fault,” you accept the blame. Well, they can’t fault you for telling the truth, at least. A fault can be a shortcoming — everyone has faults because no one is perfect — or a crack in the earth’s crust, like the San Andreas Fault.

What does WHO’S IN mean?

The phrase “Who’s in?” does exist in very informal English, at least in American English. It is equivalent to saying “Who wants to participate in X with me?” It is not used very often, at least in my experience. However, people will understand what it means if you say it in conversation.